Precautions Outside the Home: Transportation


In today’s present society, a woman does not need a bodyguard to escort her to all of the places she wishes to go. She is now able to venture forth alone; however, in doing so, she must be aware of the dangers that abound. Precautions must be taken if she wishes to remain safe.

To be completely safe from night street attackers, never go out alone at night. This advice is, at the same time, impractical because many women have night jobs. Steps can be taken to diminish danger.

Whenever you leave a building, remain in well lit areas. Have your keys in your hand before you leave a building to go to your car. Once inside the car, keep all windows rolled up, and doors closed and locked, especially if you are in an unfamiliar neighborhood. Vents can be opened for air circulation.

If you have car trouble while driving, do not alert any other cars of your trouble by putting up the hood or by turning on the emergency flashers. Doing so may invite an intruder to stop and “help” you. If someone stops, ask that person call the local law enforcement agency at the nearest telephone. Otherwise, stay in the car, wait for a patrol car to drive past, and then beep the horn to attract the officer’s attention.

If you frequently drive alone, especially at night, it would be wise to invest in a C.B. radio or cellular phone. Any emergency calls should be made on the police or emergency frequency (channel 9 in most states) in order to avoid potential intruders. Avoid short cuts down deserted alleys or lonely stretches of roads.

If you discover someone following you, drive directly to the nearest law enforcement station. If the nearest precinct office is too far, drive to a well lit service station. By being cautious and careful about driving alone at night, you can discourage a would be intruder.

Public transportation is an inexpensive way of getting around town, but it can also be a potentially dangerous situation for a woman alone. When boarding a bus or subway, visually check its occupancy. Stay away from seats occupied by men, and try to sit near the front of the bus, or by the driver. If someone begins to bother you, get up and move. Never wait for a bus, or a subway in a poorly lit area. If possible, travel with a friend, or have someone meet you at the stop where you get off. Being aware of your surroundings while using public transportation will keep you safer from attacks.

John W. Rankin

  • Mr. Barrow

    Great info! One thing I'd like to add is to be aware of your surroundings at all times. If you're walking through a parking lot don't listen to an iPod or talk on your cell phone (texting included). These distractions can seriously diminish your ability to act or react to a situation. Also if you find yourself parked next to a van or SUV that you can not see in, do not get in on that side of your car. It may be annoying to crawl across the interior of your car, but the moment you turn your back on a potential attacker you might as well throw up your hands and give up.

  • Mr. Barrow

    Great info! One thing I'd like to add is to be aware of your surroundings at all times. If you're walking through a parking lot don't listen to an iPod or talk on your cell phone (texting included). These distractions can seriously diminish your ability to act or react to a situation. Also if you find yourself parked next to a van or SUV that you can not see in, do not get in on that side of your car. It may be annoying to crawl across the interior of your car, but the moment you turn your back on a potential attacker you might as well throw up your hands and give up.